Medizin-Nobelpreis 2018

1. Oktober 2018 | Kategorie: Highlight

The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has today decided to award the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation

(eine Übersetzung der Pressemeldung – mithilfe von www.DeepL.com/Translator – finden Sie weiter unten.)

SUMMARY

Cancer kills millions of people every year and is one of humanity’s greatest health challenges. By stimulating the inherent ability of our immune system to attack tumor cells this year’s Nobel Laureates have established an entirely new principle for cancer therapy.

James P. Allison studied a known protein that functions as a brake on the immune system. He realized the potential of releasing the brake and thereby unleashing our immune cells to attack tumors. He then developed this concept into a brand new approach for treating patients.

In parallel, Tasuku Honjo discovered a protein on immune cells and, after careful exploration of its function, eventually revealed that it also operates as a brake, but with a different mechanism of action. Therapies based on his discovery proved to be strikingly effective in the fight against cancer.

Allison and Honjo showed how different strategies for inhibiting the brakes on the immune system can be used in the treatment of cancer. The seminal discoveries by the two Laureates constitute a landmark in our fight against cancer.

Can our immune defense be engaged for cancer treatment?

Cancer comprises many different diseases, all characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of abnormal cells with capacity for spread to healthy organs and tissues. A number of therapeutic approaches are available for cancer treatment, including surgery, radiation, and other strategies, some of which have been awarded previous Nobel Prizes. These include methods for hormone treatment for prostate cancer (Huggins, 1966), chemotherapy (Elion and Hitchins, 1988), and bone marrow transplantation for leukemia (Thomas 1990). However, advanced cancer remains immensely difficult to treat, and novel therapeutic strategies are desperately needed.

In the late 19th century and beginning of the 20th century the concept emerged that activation of the immune system might be a strategy for attacking tumor cells. Attempts were made to infect patients with bacteria to activate the defense. These efforts only had modest effects, but a variant of this strategy is used today in the treatment of bladder cancer. It was realized that more knowledge was needed. Many scientists engaged in intense basic research and uncovered fundamental mechanisms regulating immunity and also showed how the immune system can recognize cancer cells. Despite remarkable scientific progress, attempts to develop generalizable new strategies against cancer proved difficult.

Accelerators and brakes in our immune system

The fundamental property of our immune system is the ability to discriminate “self” from “non-self” so that invading bacteria, viruses and other dangers can be attacked and eliminated. T cells, a type of white blood cell, are key players in this defense. T cells were shown to have receptors that bind to structures recognized as non-self and such interactions trigger the immune system to engage in defense. But additional proteins acting as T-cell accelerators are also required to trigger a full-blown immune response (see Figure). Many scientists contributed to this important basic research and identified other proteins that function as brakes on the T cells, inhibiting immune activation. This intricate balance between accelerators and brakes is essential for tight control. It ensures that the immune system is sufficiently engaged in attack against foreign microorganisms while avoiding the excessive activation that can lead to autoimmune destruction of healthy cells and tissues.

A new principle for immune therapy

During the 1990s, in his laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, James P. Allison studied the T-cell protein CTLA-4. He was one of several scientists who had made the observation that CTLA-4 functions as a brake on T cells. Other research teams exploited the mechanism as a target in the treatment of autoimmune disease. Allison, however, had an entirely different idea. He had already developed an antibody that could bind to CTLA-4 and block its function (see Figure). He now set out to investigate if CTLA-4 blockade could disengage the T-cell brake and unleash the immune system to attack cancer cells. Allison and co-workers performed a first experiment at the end of 1994, and in their excitement it was immediately repeated over the Christmas break. The results were spectacular. Mice with cancer had been cured by treatment with the antibodies that inhibit the brake and unlock antitumor T-cell activity. Despite little interest from the pharmaceutical industry, Allison continued his intense efforts to develop the strategy into a therapy for humans. Promising results soon emerged from several groups, and in 2010 an important clinical study showed striking effects in patients with advanced melanoma, a type of skin cancer. In several patients signs of remaining cancer disappeared. Such remarkable results had never been seen before in this patient group.


Figure: Upper left: Activation of T cells requires that the T-cell receptor binds to structures on other immune cells recognized as ”non-self”. A protein functioning as a T-cell accelerator is also required for T cell activation. CTLA- 4 functions as a brake on T cells that inhibits the function of the accelerator. Lower left: Antibodies (green) against CTLA-4 block the function of the brake leading to activation of T cells and attack on cancer cells.Upper right: PD-1 is another T-cell brake that inhibits T-cell activation. Lower right: Antibodies against PD-1 inhibit the function of the brake leading to activation of T cells and highly efficient attack on cancer cells.

Discovery of PD-1 and its importance for cancer therapy

In 1992, a few years before Allison’s discovery, Tasuku Honjo discovered PD-1, another protein expressed on the surface of T-cells. Determined to unravel its role, he meticulously explored its function in a series of elegant experiments performed over many years in his laboratory at Kyoto University. The results showed that PD-1, similar to CTLA-4, functions as a T-cell brake, but operates by a different mechanism (see Figure). In animal experiments, PD-1 blockade was also shown to be a promising strategy in the fight against cancer, as demonstrated by Honjo and other groups. This paved the way for utilizing PD-1 as a target in the treatment of patients. Clinical development ensued, and in 2012 a key study demonstrated clear efficacy in the treatment of patients with different types of cancer. Results were dramatic, leading to long-term remission and possible cure in several patients with metastatic cancer, a condition that had previously been considered essentially untreatable.

Immune checkpoint therapy for cancer today and in the future

After the initial studies showing the effects of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade, the clinical development has been dramatic. We now know that the treatment, often referred to as “immune checkpoint therapy”, has fundamentally changed the outcome for certain groups of patients with advanced cancer. Similar to other cancer therapies, adverse side effects are seen, which can be serious and even life threatening. They are caused by an overactive immune response leading to autoimmune reactions, but are usually manageable. Intense continuing research is focused on elucidating mechanisms of action, with the aim of improving therapies and reducing side effects.

Of the two treatment strategies, checkpoint therapy against PD-1 has proven more effective and positive results are being observed in several types of cancer, including lung cancer, renal cancer, lymphoma and melanoma. New clinical studies indicate that combination therapy, targeting both CTLA-4 and PD-1, can be even more effective, as demonstrated in patients with melanoma. Thus, Allison and Honjo have inspired efforts to combine different strategies to release the brakes on the immune system with the aim of eliminating tumor cells even more efficiently. A large number of checkpoint therapy trials are currently underway against most types of cancer, and new checkpoint proteins are being tested as targets.

For more than 100 years scientists attempted to engage the immune system in the fight against cancer. Until the seminal discoveries by the two laureates, progress into clinical development was modest. Checkpoint therapy has now revolutionized cancer treatment and has fundamentally changed the way we view how cancer can be managed.

Key publications

Ishida, Y., Agata, Y., Shibahara, K., & Honjo, T. (1992). Induced expression of PD-1, a novel member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, upon programmed cell death. EMBO J., 11(11), 3887–3895.

Leach, D. R., Krummel, M. F., & Allison, J. P. (1996). Enhancement of antitumor immunity by CTLA-4 blockade. Science, 271(5256), 1734–1736.

Kwon, E. D., Hurwitz, A. A., Foster, B. A., Madias, C., Feldhaus, A. L., Greenberg, N. M., Burg, M.B. & Allison, J.P. (1997). Manipulation of T cell costimulatory and inhibitory signals for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 94(15), 8099–8103.

Nishimura, H., Nose, M., Hiai, H., Minato, N., & Honjo, T. (1999). Development of Lupus-like Autoimmune Diseases by Disruption of the PD-1 gene encoding an ITIM motif-carrying immunoreceptor. Immunity, 11, 141–151.

Freeman, G.J., Long, A.J., Iwai, Y., Bourque, K., Chernova, T., Nishimura, H., Fitz, L.J., Malenkovich, N., Okazaki, T., Byrne, M.C., Horton, H.F., Fouser, L., Carter, L., Ling, V., Bowman, M.R., Carreno, B.M., Collins, M., Wood, C.R. & Honjo, T. (2000). Engagement of the PD-1 immunoinhibitory receptor by a novel B7 family member leads to negative regulation of lymphocyte activation. J Exp Med, 192(7), 1027–1034.

Hodi, F.S., Mihm, M.C., Soiffer, R.J., Haluska, F.G., Butler, M., Seiden, M.V., Davis, T., Henry-Spires, R., MacRae, S., Willman, A., Padera, R., Jaklitsch, M.T., Shankar, S., Chen, T.C., Korman, A., Allison, J.P. & Dranoff, G. (2003). Biologic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 antibody blockade in previously vaccinated metastatic melanoma and ovarian carcinoma patients. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 100(8), 4712-4717.

Iwai, Y., Terawaki, S., & Honjo, T. (2005). PD-1 blockade inhibits hematogenous spread of poorly immunogenic tumor cells by enhanced recruitment of effector T cells. Int Immunol, 17(2), 133–144.

James P. Allison was born 1948 in Alice, Texas, USA. He received his PhD in 1973 at the University of Texas, Austin. From 1974-1977 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, California. From 1977-1984 he was a faculty member at University of Texas System Cancer Center, Smithville, Texas; from 1985-2004 at University of California, Berkeley and from 2004-2012 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York. From 1997-2012 he was an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Since 2012 he has been Professor at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas and is affiliated with the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

Tasuku Honjo was born in 1942 in Kyoto, Japan. In 1966 he became an MD, and from 1971-1974 he was a research fellow in USA at Carnegie Institution of Washington, Baltimore and at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. He received his PhD in 1975 at Kyoto University. From 1974-1979 he was a faculty member at Tokyo University and from 1979-1984 at Osaka University. Since 1984 he has been Professor at Kyoto University. He was a Faculty Dean from 1996-2000 and from 2002-2004 at Kyoto University.

Illustrations: © The Nobel Committee for Physiology or Medicine. Illustrator: Mattias Karlén

The Nobel Assembly, consisting of 50 professors at Karolinska Institutet, awards the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Its Nobel Committee evaluates the nominations. Since 1901 the Nobel Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made the most important discoveries for the benefit of humankind.

Nobel Prize® is the registered trademark of the Nobel Foundation

Source: Press release. NobelPrize.org. Nobel Media AB 2018. Mon. 1 Oct 2018.

Übersetzt mit www.DeepL.com/Translator:

Die Nobelversammlung des Karolinska Institutet hat heute beschlossen, den Nobelpreis für Physiologie oder Medizin 2018 gemeinsam an James P. Allison und Tasuku Honjo für ihre Entdeckung der Krebstherapie durch Hemmung der negativen Immunregulation zu vergeben.


ZUSAMMENFASSUNG

Krebs tötet jedes Jahr Millionen von Menschen und ist eine der größten gesundheitlichen Herausforderungen der Menschheit. Durch die Stimulierung der inhärenten Fähigkeit unseres Immunsystems, Tumorzellen anzugreifen, haben die diesjährigen Nobelpreisträger ein völlig neues Prinzip für die Krebstherapie etabliert.

James P. Allison studierte ein bekanntes Protein, das als Bremse für das Immunsystem fungiert. Er erkannte das Potenzial, die Bremse zu lösen und damit unsere Immunzellen zu befreien, um Tumore anzugreifen. Dieses Konzept entwickelte er dann zu einem völlig neuen Ansatz für die Behandlung von Patienten.

Parallel dazu entdeckte Tasuku Honjo ein Protein auf Immunzellen und zeigte nach sorgfältiger Erforschung seiner Funktion schließlich, dass es auch als Bremse wirkt, jedoch mit einem anderen Wirkmechanismus. Die auf seiner Entdeckung basierenden Therapien erwiesen sich als bemerkenswert wirksam im Kampf gegen Krebs.

Allison und Honjo zeigten, wie verschiedene Strategien zur Hemmung der Bremsen des Immunsystems bei der Behandlung von Krebs eingesetzt werden können. Die wegweisenden Entdeckungen der beiden Preisträger sind ein Meilenstein in unserem Kampf gegen den Krebs.

Kann unsere Immunabwehr für die Krebsbehandlung eingesetzt werden?
Krebs umfasst viele verschiedene Krankheiten, die alle durch unkontrollierte Vermehrung von abnormalen Zellen mit der Fähigkeit zur Ausbreitung auf gesunde Organe und Gewebe gekennzeichnet sind. Für die Krebsbehandlung stehen eine Reihe von therapeutischen Ansätzen zur Verfügung, darunter Chirurgie, Bestrahlung und andere Strategien, von denen einige mit früheren Nobelpreisen ausgezeichnet wurden. Dazu gehören Methoden zur Hormonbehandlung von Prostatakrebs (Huggins, 1966), Chemotherapie (Elion und Hitchins, 1988) und Knochenmarktransplantation bei Leukämie (Thomas 1990). Allerdings ist die Behandlung von fortgeschrittenem Krebs nach wie vor immens schwierig, und neue therapeutische Strategien sind dringend erforderlich.

Ende des 19. und Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts entstand das Konzept, dass die Aktivierung des Immunsystems eine Strategie zum Angriff auf Tumorzellen sein könnte. Es wurde versucht, Patienten mit Bakterien zu infizieren, um die Abwehr zu aktivieren. Diese Bemühungen hatten nur geringe Auswirkungen, aber eine Variante dieser Strategie wird heute bei der Behandlung von Blasenkrebs eingesetzt. Es wurde festgestellt, dass mehr Wissen benötigt wurde. Viele Wissenschaftler betreiben intensive Grundlagenforschung und entdeckten grundlegende Mechanismen, die die Immunität regulieren und zeigten auch, wie das Immunsystem Krebszellen erkennen kann. Trotz bemerkenswerter wissenschaftlicher Fortschritte erwies sich der Versuch, verallgemeinerbare neue Strategien gegen Krebs zu entwickeln, als schwierig.

Beschleuniger und Bremsen in unserem Immunsystem

Die grundlegende Eigenschaft unseres Immunsystems ist die Fähigkeit, „Selbst“ von „Nicht-Selbst“ zu unterscheiden, so dass eindringende Bakterien, Viren und andere Gefahren angegriffen und beseitigt werden können. T-Zellen, eine Art weiße Blutkörperchen, sind Schlüsselpersonen bei dieser Verteidigung. Es wurde gezeigt, dass T-Zellen Rezeptoren haben, die an als nicht selbst erkannte Strukturen binden, und solche Wechselwirkungen lösen das Immunsystem aus, sich in der Abwehr zu engagieren. Aber auch zusätzliche Proteine, die als T-Zell-Beschleuniger wirken, sind erforderlich, um eine vollständige Immunantwort auszulösen (siehe Abbildung). Viele Wissenschaftler haben zu dieser wichtigen Grundlagenforschung beigetragen und andere Proteine identifiziert, die als Bremsen auf den T-Zellen wirken und die Immunaktivierung hemmen. Diese komplizierte Balance zwischen Gaspedalen und Bremsen ist für eine strenge Kontrolle unerlässlich. Es stellt sicher, dass das Immunsystem ausreichend gegen fremde Mikroorganismen angegriffen wird und vermeidet gleichzeitig eine übermäßige Aktivierung, die zur Zerstörung gesunder Zellen und Gewebe durch Autoimmunerkrankungen führen kann.

Ein neues Prinzip für die Immuntherapie
In den 90er Jahren studierte James P. Allison in seinem Labor an der University of California, Berkeley, das T-Zell-Protein CTLA-4. Er war einer von mehreren Wissenschaftlern, die die Beobachtung gemacht hatten, dass CTLA-4 als Bremse auf T-Zellen wirkt. Andere Forscherteams nutzten den Mechanismus als Ziel bei der Behandlung von Autoimmunerkrankungen. Allison hatte jedoch eine ganz andere Idee. Er hatte bereits einen Antikörper entwickelt, der an CTLA-4 binden und dessen Funktion blockieren konnte (siehe Abbildung). Er machte sich nun auf den Weg, um zu untersuchen, ob die CTLA-4-Blockade die T-Zellen-Bremse lösen und das Immunsystem zum Angriff auf Krebszellen befreien könnte. Allison und Mitarbeiter führten Ende 1994 ein erstes Experiment durch, das in ihrer Begeisterung in der Weihnachtspause sofort wiederholt wurde. Die Ergebnisse waren spektakulär. Mäuse mit Krebs wurden durch die Behandlung mit den Antikörpern geheilt, die die Bremse hemmen und die Antitumor-T-Zellaktivität freisetzen. Trotz des geringen Interesses der Pharmaindustrie setzte Allison seine intensiven Bemühungen fort, die Strategie zu einer Therapie für den Menschen zu entwickeln. Aus mehreren Gruppen traten bald vielversprechende Ergebnisse hervor, und 2010 zeigte eine wichtige klinische Studie markante Effekte bei Patienten mit fortgeschrittenem Melanom, einer Art von Hautkrebs. Bei mehreren Patienten verschwanden die Anzeichen von Restkrebs. Solche bemerkenswerten Ergebnisse waren in dieser Patientengruppe noch nie zuvor zu sehen gewesen.


Abbildung: Oben links: Die Aktivierung von T-Zellen erfordert, dass der T-Zell-Rezeptor an Strukturen auf anderen Immunzellen bindet, die als „nicht selbst“ erkannt werden. Ein Protein, das als T-Zell-Beschleuniger fungiert, ist auch für die Aktivierung der T-Zellen erforderlich. CTLA- 4 funktioniert als Bremse auf T-Zellen, die die Funktion des Beschleunigers hemmt. Unten links: Antikörper (grün) gegen CTLA-4 blockieren die Funktion der Bremse, die zur Aktivierung von T-Zellen und zum Angriff auf Krebszellen führt. oben rechts: PD-1 ist eine weitere T-Zellen-Bremse, die die Aktivierung der T-Zellen verhindert. Unten rechts: Antikörper gegen PD-1 hemmen die Funktion der Bremse, was zur Aktivierung von T-Zellen und zum hochwirksamen Angriff auf Krebszellen führt.

Entdeckung von PD-1 und seiner Bedeutung für die Krebstherapie

1992, einige Jahre vor der Entdeckung von Allison, entdeckte Tasuku Honjo PD-1, ein weiteres Protein, das auf der Oberfläche von T-Zellen exprimiert wird. Entschlossen, seine Rolle zu entwirren, untersuchte er seine Funktion akribisch in einer Reihe von eleganten Experimenten, die er über viele Jahre in seinem Labor an der Universität Kyoto durchführte. Die Ergebnisse zeigten, dass PD-1, ähnlich wie CTLA-4, als T-Zellen-Bremse funktioniert, aber nach einem anderen Mechanismus arbeitet (siehe Abbildung). Im Tierversuch erwies sich die PD-1-Blockade auch als vielversprechende Strategie im Kampf gegen Krebs, wie Honjo und andere Gruppen zeigen. Dies ebnete den Weg für die Nutzung von PD-1 als Ziel bei der Behandlung von Patienten. Die klinische Entwicklung folgte, und 2012 zeigte eine Schlüsselstudie eine klare Wirksamkeit bei der Behandlung von Patienten mit verschiedenen Krebsarten. Die Ergebnisse waren dramatisch, was zu einer langfristigen Remission und einer möglichen Heilung bei mehreren Patienten mit metastasierendem Krebs führte, einer Erkrankung, die bisher als im Wesentlichen unbehandelbar galt.

Immun-Checkpoint-Therapie bei Krebs heute und in Zukunft

Nach den ersten Studien, die die Auswirkungen der CTLA-4- und PD-1-Blockade zeigten, war die klinische Entwicklung dramatisch. Wir wissen heute, dass die Behandlung, die oft als „Immun-Checkpoint-Therapie“ bezeichnet wird, das Ergebnis für bestimmte Gruppen von Patienten mit fortgeschrittenem Krebs grundlegend verändert hat. Ähnlich wie bei anderen Krebstherapien treten unerwünschte Nebenwirkungen auf, die schwerwiegend und sogar lebensbedrohlich sein können. Sie werden durch eine überaktive Immunantwort verursacht, die zu Autoimmunreaktionen führt, sind aber meist beherrschbar. Die intensive Weiterarbeit konzentriert sich auf die Aufklärung von Wirkungsmechanismen mit dem Ziel, Therapien zu verbessern und Nebenwirkungen zu reduzieren.

Von den beiden Behandlungsstrategien hat sich die Checkpoint-Therapie gegen PD-1 als effektiver erwiesen und es werden positive Ergebnisse bei verschiedenen Krebsarten beobachtet, darunter Lungenkrebs, Nierenkrebs, Lymphom und Melanom. Neue klinische Studien zeigen, dass eine Kombinationstherapie, die sowohl auf CTLA-4 als auch auf PD-1 abzielt, noch effektiver sein kann, wie bei Patienten mit Melanom gezeigt wird. So haben Allison und Honjo Anstrengungen unternommen, verschiedene Strategien zu kombinieren, um die Bremsen des Immunsystems zu lösen und Tumorzellen noch effizienter zu eliminieren. Gegenwärtig laufen eine Vielzahl von Kontrollpunkt-Therapie-Studien gegen die meisten Krebsarten, und neue Kontrollpunkt-Proteine werden als Zielmoleküle getestet.

Seit mehr als 100 Jahren versuchen Wissenschaftler, das Immunsystem in den Kampf gegen Krebs einzubeziehen. Bis zu den bahnbrechenden Entdeckungen der beiden Preisträger waren die Fortschritte in der klinischen Entwicklung bescheiden. Die Checkpoint-Therapie hat die Krebsbehandlung revolutioniert und die Art und Weise, wie wir Krebs behandeln, grundlegend verändert.

Key publications

Ishida, Y., Agata, Y., Shibahara, K., & Honjo, T. (1992). Induced expression of PD-1, a novel member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, upon programmed cell death. EMBO J., 11(11), 3887–3895.

Leach, D. R., Krummel, M. F., & Allison, J. P. (1996). Enhancement of antitumor immunity by CTLA-4 blockade. Science, 271(5256), 1734–1736.

Kwon, E. D., Hurwitz, A. A., Foster, B. A., Madias, C., Feldhaus, A. L., Greenberg, N. M., Burg, M.B. & Allison, J.P. (1997). Manipulation of T cell costimulatory and inhibitory signals for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 94(15), 8099–8103.

Nishimura, H., Nose, M., Hiai, H., Minato, N., & Honjo, T. (1999). Development of Lupus-like Autoimmune Diseases by Disruption of the PD-1 gene encoding an ITIM motif-carrying immunoreceptor. Immunity, 11, 141–151.

Freeman, G.J., Long, A.J., Iwai, Y., Bourque, K., Chernova, T., Nishimura, H., Fitz, L.J., Malenkovich, N., Okazaki, T., Byrne, M.C., Horton, H.F., Fouser, L., Carter, L., Ling, V., Bowman, M.R., Carreno, B.M., Collins, M., Wood, C.R. & Honjo, T. (2000). Engagement of the PD-1 immunoinhibitory receptor by a novel B7 family member leads to negative regulation of lymphocyte activation. J Exp Med, 192(7), 1027–1034.

Hodi, F.S., Mihm, M.C., Soiffer, R.J., Haluska, F.G., Butler, M., Seiden, M.V., Davis, T., Henry-Spires, R., MacRae, S., Willman, A., Padera, R., Jaklitsch, M.T., Shankar, S., Chen, T.C., Korman, A., Allison, J.P. & Dranoff, G. (2003). Biologic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 antibody blockade in previously vaccinated metastatic melanoma and ovarian carcinoma patients. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 100(8), 4712-4717.

Iwai, Y., Terawaki, S., & Honjo, T. (2005). PD-1 blockade inhibits hematogenous spread of poorly immunogenic tumor cells by enhanced recruitment of effector T cells. Int Immunol, 17(2), 133–144.

James P. Allison wurde 1948 in Alice, Texas, USA, geboren. Er promovierte 1973 an der University of Texas, Austin. Von 1974-1977 war er Postdoktorand an der Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, Kalifornien. Von 1977-1984 war er Mitglied der Fakultät am University of Texas System Cancer Center, Smithville, Texas; von 1985-2004 an der University of California, Berkeley und von 2004-2012 am Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York. Von 1997-2012 war er Ermittler am Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Seit 2012 ist er Professor am University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas und ist dem Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy angeschlossen.

Tasuku Honjo wurde 1942 in Kyoto, Japan, geboren. 1966 wurde er MD, und von 1971-1974 war er wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter in den USA an der Carnegie Institution of Washington, Baltimore und an den National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. Er promovierte 1975 an der Universität Kyoto. Von 1974-1979 war er Mitglied der Fakultät der Tokyo University und von 1979-1984 der Osaka University. Seit 1984 ist er Professor an der Universität Kyoto. Von 1996-2000 war er Dekan der Fakultät und von 2002-2004 an der Universität Kyoto.

Illustrationen: © Das Nobelkomitee für Physiologie oder Medizin. Illustrator: Mattias Karlén

Die Nobelversammlung, bestehend aus 50 Professoren des Karolinska Institutet, verleiht den Nobelpreis für Physiologie oder Medizin. Das Nobelkomitee bewertet die Nominierungen. Seit 1901 wird der Nobelpreis an Wissenschaftler verliehen, die die wichtigsten Entdeckungen zum Wohle der Menschheit gemacht haben.

Übersetzt mit www.DeepL.com/Translator


Schlagworte: , , ,

Kommentare sind geschlossen

Diese Website nutzt den Dienst 'Google Analytics', welcher von der Google lnc. (1600 Amphitheatre Parkway Mountain View, CA 94043, USA) angeboten wird, zur Analyse der Websitebenutzung durch Nutzer. Der Dienst verwendet 'Cookies' - Textdateien, welche auf Ihrem Endgerät gespeichert werden. Falls Sie kein Tracking durch Google Analytics wünschen, klicken Sie bitte hier: Google Analytics Tracking deaktivieren. Weitere Informationen

Die Cookie-Einstellungen auf dieser Website sind auf "Cookies zulassen" eingestellt, um das beste Surferlebnis zu ermöglichen. Wenn du diese Website ohne Änderung der Cookie-Einstellungen verwendest oder auf "Akzeptieren" klickst, erklärst du sich damit einverstanden.

Schließen